Now Offering CFR-210 Test Prep

December 1, 2016 at 3:16 pm | Posted in Vendor news, Logical Operations | Leave a comment
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Who says there’s no news in December? In cybersecurity, it’s never a question of if, but a question of when a breach will occur. So rather than wait for the new year, we thought we’d get the jump on 2017 and together with Logical Operations, release the Cybersec First Responder (CFR-210) practice test today.

What exactly is the CFR certification all about? Well, CFR-210 showcases your ability to to quickly detect and respond to active cyber threats. It’s not just about detailed knowledge of the analysis techniques and tools, but how to identify and respond, in real time, to the broad array of security threats affecting organizations worldwide.

So, white hats, rejoice and black hats, you’re on notice. They’re some new sheriffs rolling into town with some serious skills — and they’re not afraid to use them!

Here’s the press release for your reading pleasure.

Microsoft changing Windows 10 certification paths; Windows 8/8.1 certifications to retire in December 2016

November 16, 2016 at 1:19 pm | Posted in Certification Paths, Microsoft | Leave a comment
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Disclaimer: Exam retirements are subject to change without notice. Please go to the Official Microsoft Retired exams list to confirm or deny a specific test’s retirement date, as it may have changed since this post was originally published. Click our blog’s Certification Paths category to find the latest posts by date on this topic.

Test takers, take note: Windows 8 and 8.1 certifications are being retired in December, while Windows 10 certification paths are changing. If you are only one test into the two-test sequence, be sure to schedule your exam before the retirement.

These exams will no longer be available after December 31, 2016:

  • 70-687: Configuring Windows 8.1
  • 70-688: Supporting Windows 8.1
  • 70-689: Upgrading Your Skills to MCSA Windows 8
  • 70-692: Upgrading Your Windows XP Skills to MCSA Windows 8

If you have passed either the 687 or the 688, but you do not pass the sister exam, you will not have a valid certification after December 31.

What to do if you still need that MCSA: Windows 8 in your certification wallet

You may not know that if you hold an older certification – even as far back as Windows 2000 – you can bypass the two-exam path to a MCSA: Windows 8 and take a single upgrade exam.

You can take the 70-692 and earn the MCSA: Windows 8 if you hold any of these old-school certifications:

  • MCDST: Windows XP
  • MCSA: Windows 2000
  • MCSA: Security on Windows 2000
  • MCSA: Messaging on Windows 2000
  • MCSA: Windows Server 2003
  • MCSA: Security on Windows Server 2003
  • MCSA: Messaging on Windows Server 2003
  • MCSE: Windows 2000
  • MCSE: Security on Windows 2000
  • MCSE: Messaging on Windows 2000
  • MCSE: Windows Server 2003
  • MCSE: Security on Windows Server 2003
  • MCSE: Messaging on Windows Server 2003

You can take the 70-689 and earn the MCSA: Windows 8 if you hold any of these more recent certifications:

  • MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7
  • MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
  • MCSA: Windows 7
What to do if you want to jump to the MCSA: Windows 10

There are now two distinct paths for the MCSA: Windows 10 certification. If you have already earned the MCSA: Windows 8, you can upgrade to MCSA: Windows 10 by taking and passing this exam:

If you’re starting at square one, you can earn the MCSA: Windows 10 by passing two exams:

That’s right – there is no separate “upgrade exam” that takes you from an MCSA: 8 to an MCSA: 10. The 70-697 will either upgrade your prior cert, or knock out half of the testing requirements for a brand-new MCSA.

What to do if you’re still in a Windows 7 shop

While you will no longer have the ability to earn Windows 8 and 8.1 certifications, Microsoft has not announced any immediate plans to retire the MCITP in Windows 7. The MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7 and MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 are still valid certifications and can be earned with a two-test sequence:

MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7:

  • 70-680: Windows 7, Configuring
  • 70-685: Windows 7, Enterprise Desktop Support Technician

MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7:

  • 70-680: Windows 7, Configuring
  • 70-686: Windows 7, Enterprise Desktop Administrator

Note that the MCSA: Windows 7 is listed as a “retired certification” on the Microsoft legacy certifications page. (For more information on Microsoft’s newly streamlined certifications, read this post on Born To Learn.)

Note that as of this writing, there do not appear to be any direct upgrade exams from the MSCA: Windows 7 (or its equivalent MCITPs) to the MCSA: Windows 10. Your best bet there is to take the two-exam sequence starting with 70-689 (upgrade to MCSA: Win 8 from MCITP: Win 7) and 70-697 (upgrade from MCSA: Win 8 to MCSA: Win 10). Remember that you need to pass 70-689 before December 31, but you can take the 70-697 at any time in 2017.

Bundle and save with exam vouchers and practice tests from Transcender

Be sure to subscribe to email updates from Transcender to receive future sale alerts, bundles, deals, and discounts!

Windows 7 Practice Exams and Bundles

Windows 8 Practice Exams and Bundles

Windows 10 Practice Exams and Bundles

Happy certifying!
-The Transcender Team

Transcender adds GIAC Security Essentials (GSEC) to its practice test lineup

November 12, 2016 at 8:02 am | Posted in GIAC, Transcender news | Leave a comment
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As reported by Stanford Journalism, the demand for infosec jobs is likely to rise 53 percent through 2018. Earning a cybersecurity certification can help qualify you for those jobs. In response to the growing demand, Transcender has added a top infosec vendor to our security exam lineup: Global Information Assurance Certification (GIAC). GIAC is an OS-neutral organization that develops highly focused security certifications, including some of the hardest and most prestigious in the field.

The GSEC: GIAC Security Essentials exam is an ANSI/ISO/IEC 17024 accredited certification and lasts for four years before the candidate must re-certify. This is an intermediate-level exam that covers a wide range of topics, from the nuts and bolts of logging and network protocols to overall risk management and security practices.  You can click  here for a complete list of the topics you’ll see on the GSEC exam: https://www.giac.org/certification/security-essentials-gsec

Transcender’s SecurityCert: GIAC Security Essentials (GSEC) 2016 Practice Exam is meant for candidates who want to demonstrate they are qualified for IT systems hands-on roles with respect to security tasks. To be successful, candidates need to understand information security to a practical level beyond simple terminology and concepts. Our practice test has 360 practice questions and 558 flashcards to help you prepare for the live exam, which has 180 questions and up to a 5 hour time limit.

The GSEC: GIAC exam is $1,249 (or $689 when taken with an associated SANS training course). Our practice exam  formats range from $99 – $119, so we can offer you a cost-effective way to test your chops before sitting the live question bank. (If you’re new to Transcender, welcome! And be sure to review why you should read those long, boring explanations.)

Happy certifying,

-The Transcender Team

Overcoming fear (of) and loathing (for) professional development: a free Transcender webinar

October 17, 2016 at 2:07 pm | Posted in Transcender news | Leave a comment
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Are you passionate about professional development? We are too! Troy McMillan has prepared an informative FREE webinar to discuss common barriers to professional development, and strategies for finding the right path.

This webinar is suitable for both managers and team members. Managers can find out how to best encourage their team to gain new skills by taking advantage of learning opportunities. Staff members can discover what a steady dose of skills improvement can do for their outlook and their career.

When: Wednesday, October 26th, 2016

Time: 11:00 AM EST / 10:00 CST / 9:00 MST / 8:00 PST
Presenter: Troy McMillan

To register, click this link: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4211778623661375236

(Transcender will not sell, share, or otherwise use your contact information.)

Introducing the new CCNA: ICNDv3 exams, 100-105 and 200-105

October 12, 2016 at 8:27 am | Posted in Certification Paths, Cisco | Leave a comment
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Cisco has officially retired the old CCNA exams (100-101 and 200-101, or the combined 220-120), so the opportunity to take the ICNDv2 has come and gone. The new path to Cisco’s flagship certification is the ICNDv3 path. As of October 2016, you need to pass one of these combinations to earn the CCNA Routing and Switching certification:

  • Exam 100-105: Interconnecting Cisco Networking Devices Part 1 (ICND1)
  • Exam 200-105: Interconnecting Cisco Networking Devices Part 2 (ICND2)

or

  • Exam 200-125: CCNA Interconnecting Cisco Networking Devices: Accelerated (CCNAX)

Passing the 100-105 exam alone will also earn you the Cisco Certified Entry Network Technician (CCENT) certification.

How much change should I expect for the ICND1?

For the first exam, Cisco has rearranged the material and condensed the objectives from seven to five. Here’s a comparison of the old and new objectives:

OLD: 100-101 ICND1 v2.0
1.0 Operation of IP Data Networks
2.0 LAN Switching Technologies
3.0 IP Addressing
4.0 IP Routing Technologies
5.0 IP Services
6.0 Network Device Security
7.0 Troubleshooting

NEW: 100-105 ICND1 v3.0
1.0 Network Fundamentals
2.0 LAN Switching Technologies
3.0 Routing Technologies
4.0 Infrastructure Services
5.0 Infrastructure Management

While at first glance it might appear that the CCENT removed troubleshooting questions entirely, the new exam simply integrates troubleshooting into each objective. For example,  Objective 2.0: LAN Switching Technologies will have you troubleshoot interface and cable issues (collisions, errors, duplex, speed), while in Objective 1.0: Network Fundamentals, you’ll have to troubleshoot IPv4 and IPv6, as well as “apply troubleshooting methodologies to resolve problems:”

  • 1.7.a Perform fault isolation and document
  • 1.7.b Resolve or escalate
  • 1.7.c Verify and monitor resolution

The changes in the objectives typically just mean reorganization of the old material, but there have been a few additions and deletions of topics for this exam, which I’ll explain.

Key Topics Removed from ICND1 or Moved to ICND2 Exam:

OSPF (single area) and other OSPF topics were moved into ICND2. Instead, RIP is used to introduce CCENT candidates to IP routing protocols.

Dual Stack was removed from ICND1, since there are many different IPv4 to IPv6 transition technologies being used.

Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) has been removed.

Key Topics Added:
  • High level knowledge of the impact and interactions of infrastructure components in an Enterprise network, specifically:
    • Firewalls
    • Access Points
    • Wireless Controllers
  • Awareness of the Collapsed Core architecture compared to traditional three-tier architectures. This option collapses the Distribution and Core into a single tier, with the Access as the second tier.
  • Configuring and verifying IPv6 Stateless Address Auto Configuration (SLAAC).
  • Coverage of anycast IPv6 addressing.
  • Knowledge of Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP). An L2 discovery protocol is used in addition to Cisco Discovery Protocol.
  • Knowledge of RIPv2 for IPv4 as the primary focus for understanding of how routing protocols work.
  • DNS and DHCP related connectivity issues.
  • Syslog message logging for device monitoring.
  • Skills and knowledge of device management related to backup and restoring device configurations, IOS feature licensing, and configuring time zones.

How much change should I expect for the ICND2?

While the number of objective domains has remained 5 in the update of the 200-101 (ICND2)  to the 200-105 exam , those domain topics have changed and also the content. The comparison of the domain changes are as follows:

OLD 200-101 ICND2 v2.0:

1.0 LAN Switching Technologies
2.0 IP Routing Technologies
3.0 IP Services
4.0 Troubleshooting
5.0 WAN Technologies

NEW 200-105 ICND2 v3.0:

1.0 LAN Switching Technologies
2.0 Routing Technologies
3.0 WAN Technologies
4.0 Infrastructure Services
5.0 Infrastructure Maintenance

Topics have been both moved and deleted.

Key Topics Removed from ICND2:

Frame-Relay and Serial WAN technologies are no longer covered.

VRRP and GLBP have been removed from First Hop Redundancy Protocols. Only HSRP remains, since it is most commonly deployed.

Key Topics Added to ICND2:
  • Knowledge of dual-homed vs single-homed Intelligent WAN topology options.
  • Basic knowledge of external BGP (eBGP) used to connect Enterprise branches.
  • Expanded VPN topics to include DMVPN, Site-to-Site VPN, and Client VPN technologies commonly used by Enterprises.
  • Understanding of how Cloud resources are being used in Enterprise network architectures, including:
    • How cloud services will affect traffic paths and flows
    • Common virtualized services and how these coexist with a legacy infrastructure
    • Basics of virtual network infrastructure (Network Function Virtualization)
  • Awareness of Programmable Network (SDN) architectures including:
    • Separation of the control plane and data plane
    • How a controller functions and communicates northbound to network applications and southbound to the R&S infrastructure using APIs.
  • How to use the Path Trace application for ACLs which is a key new network application enabled by the Application Policy Infrastructure Controller – Enterprise Module (APIC-EM). This tool automates the troubleshooting and resolution of complex ACL deployments.
  • Understanding of QoS concepts related to marking, shaping, and policing mechanisms used to manage congestion of various types of traffic. The need for QoS and how it is used for prioritizing voice, video and data traffic. Plus an understanding of the automation

How much change should I expect for the combined exam?

The 200-125 exam, like its predecessor the 200-120, covers all topics from the 100-105 and 200-105. The content is organized in the following domains:

1.0 Network Fundamentals
2.0 LAN Switching Technologies
3.0 Routing Technologies
4.0 WAN Technologies
5.0 Infrastructure Services
6.0 Infrastructure Security
7.0 Infrastructure Management

Everything that has been written about the prior two exams applies to the 200-120.

What if I passed some of the old exams, but need the new certification – or to recertify?

Cisco has developed a handy tool, called the Associate-Level Certifications Exam Logic Tool, that lets you plug in your exact combination of exams to predict which ones you’ll require: http://www.cisco.com/web/learning/tools/ccna_tool/index.html

CCNA Routing and Switching is a three-year certification. When three years have passed, you must recertify. This page has the information you need to help you plan your recertification path.

And, finally, here are the links to the CCENT and CCNA Transcender practice exams. Keep your eyes peeled for special holiday exam pricing, and be sure to sign up for our mailing list if you aren’t receiving deal notifications!

Transcender Practice Exam for 100-105 NetCert: Interconnecting Cisco Network Devices Part 1 (ICND1) v3.0

Transcender Practice Exam for 200-105NetCert: Interconnecting Cisco Networking Devices Part 2 (ICND2) v3.0

Transcender Practice Exam for 200-125 Composite Cisco Certified Network Associate Exam

Until next time,

–Troy McMillan

Microsoft raised exam certification prices in July

August 23, 2016 at 12:07 pm | Posted in Microsoft, Transcender news, Vendor news | Leave a comment
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Microsoft made a worldwide adjustment in the price of their MCP and certification exams for non-academic titles. The increased prices went into effect on July 18, 2106.

The pricing change does NOT affect pre-paid vouchers from Transcender or vouchers purchased from Pearson VUE, Courseware Marketplace, or through academic Volume Licensing. You can continue to use any vouchers you bought prior to the pricing upgrade without having to make up the additional cost.

Student discounts have not changed, but they will be calculated from the new exam price.

In most cases the price increase was around USD $15. To find a price for a specific exam, find your test on the Microsoft Certification Exam List or go directly to Pearson Vue and check the price for your region.

Free webinar on social media hacks – staying safe while surfing

July 29, 2016 at 11:49 am | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

What do you think when you hear “social media hack?” The top of everyone’s nightmare list is having an attacker take control of your Facebook account and impersonate you online, expose private information, or steal your data – or your money. This kind of hack gets the most news, and it’s potentially the most dangerous attack. The results can range from simple pranking or trolling to blackmail, identity theft, account lockout, and financial loss.

But how easily can you recognize other types of social media hacks – the ones that try to steal corporate data, spread malicious websites or code, or even influence the course of an election?

What makes these attacks uniquely “social media” based is that they rely on these huge user bases of relatively unsophisticated users – like grandma and your boss’s boss – and they take advantage of how few checks and balances there are when it comes to creating a user profile.

Join Transcender’s training expert George Monsalvatge for a 45-minute webinar that will help you (and your users) identify these increasingly sophisticated and distributed attacks aimed at social media networks. The webinar is FREE and relatively painless to join – just click the helpful link below:

Social Media Hack Attacks:
Staying Safe While Surfing
Register Today!
This webinar discusses several types of social media attacks and discusses best practices in order to prevent social media attacks.
8/3/2016 at 12:00 pm EST / 11:00 am CST

 

Lightning deal: Microsoft offers FREE upgrades for 2016 MCSA in June

June 16, 2016 at 8:35 am | Posted in Certification Paths, Microsoft | Leave a comment
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Microsoft recently announced an incentive for IT pros working toward their MCSA in Windows Server 2012 or their MCSA in SQL Server 2012/2014: finish your certification by June 30, 2016, and earn a free voucher for the 2016 upgrade exam.

Upgrade path for Windows Server 2016

The MCSA in Windows Server 2012 requires three exams:

  • 70-410: Installing and Configuring Windows Server 2012
  • 70-411: Administering Windows Server 2012
  • 70-412: Configuring Advanced Windows Server 2012 Services

If you have all three under your belt by June 30, you’ll qualify for a free voucher to sit exam 70-743: Upgrading Your Skills to MCSA: Windows Server 2016. No exam details are available at this time.

Upgrade path for SQL Server 2016

The MCSA: SQL Server 2012/2014 also requires three exams:

  • 70-461: Querying Microsoft SQL Server 2012/2014
  • 70-462: Administering Microsoft SQL Server 2012/2014
  • 70-463: Implementing a Data Warehouse with Microsoft SQL Server 2012/2014

Interestingly, although only one upgrade exam number is shown for SQL Server 2016 (70-762), it looks like there are actually three separate upgrade options:

  • Earn an MCSA: SQL Server 2016 (Database Development) by taking 70-762: Developing SQL Databases
  • Earn an MCSA: SQL Server 2016 (Database Administration) by taking 70-762: Provisioning SQL Databases
  • Earn an MCSA: SQL Server 2016 (Business Intelligence Dev) by taking 70-762: Developing SQL Data Models

Again, Microsoft hasn’t released any exam objectives or details at the time of this post.

Do I have time to study?

Absolutely. Transcender has a full range of practice tests, e-learning, and virtual labs for each track, including a 30-day online access version of the practice tests:

What if I already have an MCSA in 2012 / 2014?

The wording was “between now [June 2] and June 30, 2016,” so this offer is probably limited to people who haven’t yet passed all the required tests. You can see Microsoft’s original post at the Born To Learn blog, and ask whether the offer extends to those who already have their certification in hand. However, as a certified professional, you should already be receiving emails from Microsoft each time a free beta exam is released (like the recent offer for the 70-698), so if you don’t qualify for this deal, odds are that a similar one will come your way.

Happy certifying!

~ The Transcender Team

The New A+ 900 Series: What’s New (Part 5 of 5)

May 20, 2016 at 3:09 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Welcome back to my series of posts on the new A+ exam. Did you think I was NEVER going to finish this blog series? Me too! But I have been really snowed in working on some new products that I think will really please our customers. One of those is a practice test for (ISC)2’s SSCP exam. And there are a few more exciting security titles are coming soon! Watch our website for more information.

The old A+ 220-801 and 220-802 exams are still available, but they will retire on June 30, 2016 in the United States. CompTIA released a new version of the A+ certification by rolling out the 220-901 and 220-902 exams on December 15, 2015.

  • In my first post, I went over the timeline and what to expect from the exam changes as a whole.
  • In my second post, I went into detail regarding the first two objectives for 220-901, Hardware and Networking.
  • In my third post, I went into detail regarding the last two objectives for 220-901, Mobile Devices and Hardware & Network Troubleshooting.
  • In my fourth post, I covered the first two objectives for 220-902, Windows Operating Systems and Other Operating Systems and Technologies.

In this post, I will cover the rest of 220-902, a total of three objectives: Security, Software Troubleshooting, and Operational Procedures. I’ll give you the entire overview of each objective, list each subobjective, tell you where each topic fell in the old A+ 800-series (if applicable), and put all changes or additions in RED ITALICS.

I will not call out any deleted topics, although CompTIA has removed some topics. This is because I am not really sure if those topics were actually removed from the exam, or if they are just so insignificant that they aren’t called out in the objective listing, but are still floating around in some test questions. Remember that CompTIA’s objective listing contains a disclaimer that says,

“The lists of examples provided in bulleted format below each objective are not exhaustive lists. Other examples of technologies, processes or tasks pertaining to each objective may also be included on the exam although not listed or covered in this objectives document.”

For this reason, I didn’t want to focus on what was removed. My exam experience has shown that the bullet lists are not exhaustive. Spending time focusing on what was removed may give you a false sense of security by making you think you don’t need to study those topics. So I am just ignoring any topic removals.

First, a note about “Bloom’s Levels”

You’ll see me refer to topics changing their Bloom’s level. In the instructional design world, Bloom’s taxonomy is used to describe the depth or complexity of a learning outcome, just as the OSI model describes the level at which a network component operates. Level 1 is basic memorization (what is a router?), where level 6 is complete mastery of a concept (designing a network from scratch).

If I mention here that a Bloom’s level has changed, it generally means that CompTIA is asking for something more complex than memorization. While these changes shouldn’t scare you, there is a bit more “rubber meeting the road” to the higher Bloom’s levels. For example, instead of recognizing various LCD technologies from a list, you may be asked to evaluate which LCD is the best choice for a given scenario. Instead of answering a question about how CIDR notation behaves in the abstract, you may be asked to configure a subnet mask.

220-902 Objective 3: Security

A+ 220-802 covered Security in its own domain. It included prevention methods, security threats, securing a workstation, data destruction/disposal, and wired/wireless network security. The biggest change in this objective is the new topics that are covered (obviously because new security threats have emerged) and the inclusion of Windows OS security settings and securing mobile devices.

What’s changed? In A+ 220-902, Security now includes OS security settings. No big surprise: Windows is widely used, and securing it should be the top priority of anyone using it daily. This objective also includes mobile device security, which should also not be a surprise with the popularity of these devices increasing, particularly in enterprises.

3.1 Identify common security threats and vulnerabilities. – From Objective 3, subobjective 2 in the old 220-802. The wording changed to “Identity” from “Compare and contrast,” which affected the Bloom’s level by moving up to the application level.  New topics were added:

  • Malware – Revised to include spyware, viruses, worms, trojans, and rootkits under a single bullet with ransomware being a new entry.
  • Spear Phishing – added
  • Spoofing – added
  • Zero day attack – added
  • Zombie/botnet – added
  • Brute forcing – added
  • Dictionary attacks – added
  • Non-compliant systems – added
  • Violations of security best practices – added
  • Tailgating – added
  • Man-in-the-middle – added

3.2 Compare and contrast common prevention methods. – From Objective 3, subobjective 1 in 220-802. The wording changed to “Compare and contrast” from “Apply and use,” which affected the Bloom’s level  by moving down the comprehension level. These new topics were added:

  • Physical security 
    • Mantrap – changed from Tailgating in the 220-802 to more accurately reflect the actual preventive control
    • Cable locks – added to the Physical security section
    • ID badges – changed from Badges in the 220-802 to more accurately reflect the preventive control
    • Smart card – added to the Physical security section
    • Tokens – changed from RSA tokens in the 220-802 to more accurately reflect the preventive control
    • Entry control roster – added to the Physical security section
  • Digital security
    • Antivirus/Antimalware – added Antimalware to the Digital security section
    • Multifactor authentication – added to the Digital security section
    • VPN – added to the Digital security section
    • DLP – added Data loss prevention (DLP) to the Digital security section
    • Disabling ports – added to the Digital security section
    • Access control lists – added to the Digital security section
    • Smart card – added to the Digital security section
    • Email filtering – added to the Digital security section
    • Trusted/untrusted software sources – added to the Digital security section
  • User education/AUP – Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) added

Continue Reading The New A+ 900 Series: What’s New (Part 5 of 5)…

Flash sale! CompTIA A+ Exam Series Will Retire June 30, 2016

May 4, 2016 at 1:23 pm | Posted in CompTIA | Leave a comment
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Have you been studying for the A+ at a leisurely pace, figuring there’s plenty of time to knock it out? Did you pass the 220-801, only to wait for the right time to take the 220-802? If so, time is no longer on your side. The 800 version of CompTIA’s flagship certification exam will retire in just under two months. This is relevant because you cannot mix and match exam versions. If you passed the 220-801 or 220-802 exam, you must pass the other 800-series exam to obtain your A+, or else take both 900-series exams.

You will need to complete the English-language 800 series exams by June 30, 2016 to see the old test objectives. After that time, all test takers will have to sit for the 220-901 and 220-902 instead.

Our CompTIA specialist, Robin Abernathy, has covered the updates to the A+ exam in a series of blog posts. Part 1 explains how the exam topic breakdown differs in 901/902 compared with 801/802 and suggests that test-takers adopt a different study approach. Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, and (forthcoming) Part 5 drill down into the nitty-gritty differences between the two knowledge banks.

If you don’t feel like clicking over right now, suffice it to say that Robin (and most test-takers) felt that the 801/802 topics had enough overlap that the test taker could (and probably should) schedule both exams to fall as close as possible to each other – even within the same day – and knock out their A+ certification in one fell swoop. Both tests covered aspects of the same technologies, so studying for one meant studying for the other by default.

By contrast, there is almost NO overlap between the topics tested on 220-901 and 220-902, which means that you’ll want to study and sit for each exam separately.

The 901/902 drops some outdated topics (no more questions on CRTs or Windows XP) and modernizes device coverage – instead of laptops, “mobile device” questions also cover tablets and phones. It also moves the OS focus beyond Windows to acknowledge the presence of both Linux and Mac OS X in the workplace. The 901/902 is also more hands-on than in previous generations – some may say it’s harder; others may call it more realistic. For example, instead of being asked to define a given command’s function, you could be given a scenario and asked to choose the best command to troubleshoot this device. Instead of simply identifying what a setting does, you will likely be asked to choose the correct setting for a given set of conditions.

There is still plenty of time to buy your 800-series A+ practice exams, and to help you study, Transcender has put them on sale.

SAVE 50%

on the 30-Day Online Access practice exams to test your knowledge for the 220-801 and 220-802 certifications.

Enter promo code: T2016EXP

Pass Guarantee not valid for last minute study aid promotions.

 

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