Obtaining Your PMP Certification: A PMP 4th Edition Study Plan – Part V

January 4, 2010 at 10:56 am | Posted in PMI | 2 Comments
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Happy 2010, happy new year, and welcome back to my ongoing series directed at PMI certification candidates. As I stated previously, there are six objectives covered in the PMP exam:

  • Initiating – covered in Part 1
  • Planning – covered in Part 2
  • Executing – covered in Part 3
  • Monitoring and Controlling – covered in Part 4
  • Closing – covered in this post
  • Professional and Social Responsibility – covering in the next PMP post

In this post, I’ll go over the changes made to the Closing process group from the PMBOK Third Edition to Fourth Edition, and then I’ll explain how the PMBOK Fourth Edition helped us with their formalized lists.

Process Group Five: Closing

In the PMBOK Third Edition, the Closing phase had two processes. In the PMBOK Fourth Edition, it still has two processes, but both have been renamed. The Close Project process has been renamed Close Project or Phase. The Contract Closure process has been renamed Close Procurements.

The changes to the Close Project or Phase process are shown in Table 17.

Element Element Type Status Explanation
Contract documentation Input Removed This input is no longer used in the Close Project or Phase process.
Enterprise environmental factors Input Removed This input is no longer used in the Close Project or Phase process.
Work performance information Input Removed This input is no longer used in the Close Project or Phase process.
Deliverables Input Renamed This input has been renamed accepted deliverables.
Project management methodology Tool Removed This tool is no longer used in the Close Project or Phase process.
Project management information system Tool Removed This tool is no longer used in the Close Project or Phase process.
Administrative closure procedure Output Removed This output is no longer created in the Close Project or Phase process.
Contract closure procedure Output Removed This output is no longer created in the Close Project or Phase process.
Table 17: Changes to Close Project or Phase process

The changes to the Close Procurements process are shown in Table 18.

Element Element Type Status Explanation
Project management plan Input Added This input includes the procurement management plan.
Contract management plan Input Removed This input is no longer used in the Close Procurements process.
Contract documentation Input Renamed This input has been renamed procurement documentation.
Contract closure procedure Input Removed This input is no longer used in the Close Procurements process.
Negotiated settlements Tool New This tool includes using alternative dispute resolution to negotiate procurement closure.
Closed contract Output Renamed This output has been renamed closed procurements.
Table 18: Changes to Close Procurements process

Formalized Lists

In the PMBOK Fourth Edition, the enterprise environmental factors, organizational process assets, project management plan, project documents, project charter, and project scope statement lists were formalized to prevent confusion. All of the elements were documented.

Enterprise environmental factors are any factors that influence a project. All enterprises involved in the project will enhance or constrain the project. The enterprise environmental factors include the following:

  • Organizational culture, structure, and processes
  • Government or industry standards
  • Infrastructure
  • Existing human resources
  • Personnel administration
  • Company work authorization systems
  • Marketplace conditions
  • Stakeholder risk tolerances
  • Political climate
  • Organization’s established communications channels
  • Commercial databases
  • Project management information system (PMIS)

Enterprise environmental factors are inputs to a process and can be updated as an output of a process.

Organizational process assets include any process-related assets in the organizations involved in the project. Two basic categories of organizational process assets are used: 1) processes and procedures and 2) corporate knowledge base. The processes and procedures that are considered part of the organizational process assets include the following:

  • Organizational standard processes
  • Standardized guidelines, work instructions, proposal evaluation criteria, and performance measurement criteria
  • Templates
  • Guidelines and criteria for tailoring the organization’s processes to satisfy project needs
  • Organizational communication requirements
  • Project closure guidelines or requirements

The corporate knowledge base includes process measurement databases, project files, historical information and lessons learned knowledge base, issue and defect management databases, configuration management knowledge bases, and financial databases.

The project management plan is the complete document that defines how a project will be executed, managed, and controlled. The sections of the project management plan include:

  • Change management plan
  • Communications management plan
  • Configuration management plan
  • Cost management plan
  • Cost performance baseline
  • Human resources plan
  • Process improvement plan
  • Procurement management plan
  • Quality management plan
  • Requirements management plan
  • Risk management plan
  • Schedule baseline
  • Schedule management plan
  • Scope baselines (includes WBS, WBS dictionary, and scope statement)
  • Scope management plan

Project documents are used to help the project manager in managing the project. However, they are not considered part of the project management plan. The documents that are considered part of the project documentation include the following:

  • Activity attributes
  • Activity cost estimates
  • Activity list
  • Assumption log
  • Basis of estimates
  • Change log
  • Charter
  • Contracts
  • Duration estimates
  • Forecasts
  • Issue log
  • Milestone list
  • Performance reports
  • Project funding requirements
  • Proposals
  • Procurement documents
  • Project organizational structure
  • Quality control measurements
  • Quality checklists
  • Quality metrics
  • Responsibility assignment matrix
  • Requirements traceability matrix
  • Resource breakdown structure
  • Resource calendars
  • Resource requirements
  • Risk register
  • Roles and responsibilities
  • Sellers list
  • Source selection criteria
  • Stakeholder analysis
  • Stakeholder management strategy
  • Stakeholder register
  • Stakeholder requirements
  • Statement of work
  • Teaming agreements
  • Team performance assessments
  • Work performance information
  • Work performance measurements

The project charter is a document from the project sponsor that formally authorizes the project. It should include all of the following elements:

  • Project purpose or justification
  • Measurable project objectives and related success criteria
  • High-level requirements
  • High-level project description and product characteristics
  • Summary milestone schedule
  • Summary budget
  • Project approval requirements
  • Assigned project manager, responsibility, and authority level
  • Name and responsibility of the person(s) authorizing project charter

The project scope statement describes the project scope to ensure that future project decisions remain inside the scope. It should include all of the following:

  • Product scope description
  • Project deliverables
  • Product user acceptance criteria
  • Project constraints
  • Project assumptions

These lists ensure that project managers and team members can better understand and differentiate between the different components.

That’s all for today! Stay tuned for Part VI, which discusses the Professional and Social Responsibility section of the exam.

-Robin

2 Comments »

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  1. Thank you for these great information

    Regards

  2. Please Notify me of follow-up comments via email.


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