PMP: Another Perspective

February 20, 2014 at 11:58 am | Posted in PMI, Study hints | Leave a comment
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If you have been following Transcender’s blog for a while, you know that we write a lot of posts about the PMP certification. We’ve blogged about the PMBOK changes, the application process, and even our test-taking experience.  And, sometimes, we find other sources that we feel are worth sharing with our readers.

Heather Christian recently blogged about her exam experience. It wasn’t pretty. It wasn’t perfect. But it was a pass! And although she didn’t use our exam preparation product, we felt what she had to say about her overall experience was important information. So we decided to share the link to her blog with you, hoping that it might help you on your journey: http://heatherchristian.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/journey-to-pmp/.

Here’s a quick sample:

 I had been given the advice to read the last two sentences at the end of long questions and figure out what they are trying to ask before reading the whole thing. . . . I was only really caught out trying to over complicate a question once.  I quickly realized that calculating the paths given me in one of the network diagram questions was a fools errand that would take me 20 minutes.  A quick re-scan of the question revealed information that made the hairy seeming question very very simple.

Incidentally, if Heather’s blog inspires you, our PMP practice test has been updated to the PMBOK 5th Edition.

Happy testing!

-Robin

PMBOK 5th Edition: Changes to the Planning Process Group (Part 4 of 4) 6/9

October 30, 2013 at 12:49 pm | Posted in PMI, Study hints | Leave a comment
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This is the sixth installment of my PMBOK 5th Edition overview (and we’re still on the second Process Group):

Because the Planning Process Group contains 24 processes, I broke this overview into four posts to cover all of its processes in smaller, more easily digestible chunks.

Part 4 (this post) will cover the following processes:

  • Plan Risk Management
  • Identify Risks
  • Perform Qualitative Risk Analysis
  • Perform Quantitative Risk Analysis
  • Plan Risk Responses
  • Plan Procurement Management
  • Plan Stakeholder Management

The rest of the processes are broken down as follows:

  • Part 1 covered Develop Project Management Plan, Plan Scope Management, Collect Requirements, Define Scope, and Create WBS
  • Part 2 covered Plan Schedule Management, Define Activities, Sequence Activities, Estimate Activity Resources, Estimate Activity Durations, and Develop Schedule
  • Part 3 covered Plan Cost Management, Estimate Costs, Determine Budget, Plan Quality Management, Plan Human Resource Management, and Plan Communications Management.

Let’s launch into the final seven processes of the Planning Process Group!

Changes to the Plan Risk Management process

The Plan Risk Management process now has five inputs:

  • the project management plan – new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • the project charter – new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • the stakeholder register – new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • enterprise environmental factors (EEFs)
  • organizational process assets (OPAs)

In the PMBOK 4th Edition, the Plan Risk Management process included the cost management plan, schedule management plan, and communications management plan as inputs. In the PMBOK 5th Edition, these plans are all subsidiary plans of the project management plan, so they are no longer considered separate inputs.

This process has three tools and techniques:

  • Analytical techniquesnew to the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • Expert judgment – new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • Meetings – renamed in the PMBOK 5th Edition. It was referred to as planning meetings and analysis in the PMBOK 4th Edition.

The output of this process is the risk management plan.

Changes to the Identify Risks process

The Identify Risks process now has 13 inputs:

  • the risk management plan
  • the cost management plan
  • the schedule management plan
  • the quality management plan
  • the human resource management plan - new to the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • the scope baseline
  • activity cost estimates
  • activity duration estimates
  • the stakeholder register
  • project documents
  • procurement documentsnew to the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • enterprise environmental factors (EEFs)
  • organizational process assets (OPAs)

There are no changes to the tools and techniques used by this process. In addition, this process still has a single output: the risk register.

Changes to the Perform Qualitative Risk Analysis process

The Perform Qualitative Risk Analysis process has two new inputs. The five inputs to this process are:

  • the risk management plan
  • the scope baseline - new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • the risk register
  • enterprise environmental factors (EEFs) – new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • organizational process assets (OPAs)

The project scope statement is no longer listed as an input because it is part of the scope baseline.

The tools and techniques used by this process have not changed.

The output of this process is project document updates. Risk register updates are no longer outputs of this process because the risk register is part of the project documents.

Changes to the Perform Quantitative Risk Analysis process

The Perform Quantitative Risk Analysis process now has six inputs:

  • the risk management plan
  • the cost management plan
  • the schedule management plan
  • the risk register
  • enterprise environmental factors (EEFs) – new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • organizational process assets (OPAs)

The tools and techniques used by this process have not changed.

The outputs of this process are project document updates. Like in the Perform Qualitative Risk Analysis process, risk register updates are no longer listed as outputs of the process because the risk register is part of the project documents that can be updated during this process.

Changes to the Plan Risk Responses process

The Plan Risk Responses process was not changed very much. The inputs, tools/techniques, and outputs of this process are the same. The only changes I see in this section of the PMBOK is an expanded explanation of the strategies for negative and positive risks.

Changes to the Plan Procurement Management process (formerly the Plan Procurements process)

For this process, there was a name change in the PMBOK 5th Edition: Plan Procurements was changed to Plan Procurement Management.

The Plan Procurement Management process now has nine inputs:

  • the project management plan - new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • the requirements documentation
  • the risk register
  • activity resource requirements
  • the project schedule
  • activity cost estimates
  • the stakeholder register – new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • enterprise environmental factors (EEFs)
  • organizational process assets (OPAs)

There are two new tools used in this process. The tools and techniques used by this process are as follows:

  • make-or-buy analysis
  • expert judgment
  • market research – new to the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • meetings – new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition

Contract types, which was a tool listed in the PMBOK 4th Edition, is now discussed in Section 12.1.1.9: Organizational Process Assets.

This process has one new output. The seven outputs of this process are as follows:

  • the procurement management plan
  • the procurement statement of work
  • procurement documents
  • source selection criteria
  • make-or-buy decisions
  • change requests
  • project document updates – new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition
Introducing the Plan Stakeholder Management process - NEW IN PMBOK 5th EDITION

The Plan Stakeholder Management process is a new process to the Planning Process Group and the Project Stakeholder Management Knowledge Area. This process creates the stakeholder management plan that is used to develop the management strategies to effectively engage stakeholders in the project.

The Plan Stakeholder Management process has four inputs:

  • the project management plan
  • the stakeholder register
  • enterprise environmental factors (EEFs)
  • organizational process assets (OPAs)

This process has three tools/techniques: expert judgment, analytical techniques,  and meetings. The analytical techniques include stakeholder engagement assessment matrix and other techniques.

This process has two outputs: the stakeholder management plan and project document updates.

That covers all the processes for this post and completes the Planning Process Group. Watch in the coming days for the posts covering the changes to the Executing, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing Process Groups.

Drop  me a line if you have any questions! I would love to hear from you….

-Robin

PMBOK 5th Edition: Changes to the Planning Process Group (Part 3 of 4) 5/9

October 25, 2013 at 9:29 am | Posted in PMI, Study hints | Leave a comment
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This is the fifth installment of my PMBOK 5th Edition overview (and we’re still on the second Process Group):

Because the Planning Process Group contains 24 processes, I will be breaking this overview into four posts to cover all of its processes in smaller, more easily digestible chunks.

Part 3 (this post) will cover the following processes:

  • Plan Cost Management
  • Estimate Costs
  • Determine Budget
  • Plan Quality Management
  • Plan Human Resource Management
  • Plan Communications Management

The rest of the processes are broken down as follows:

  • Part 1 covered Develop Project Management Plan, Plan Scope Management, Collect Requirements, Define Scope, and Create WBS
  • Part 2 covered Plan Schedule Management, Define Activities, Sequence Activities, Estimate Activity Resources, Estimate Activity Durations, and Develop Schedule
  • Part 4 will cover Plan Risk Management, Identify Risks, Perform Qualitative Risk Analysis, Perform Quantitative Risk Analysis, Plan Risk Responses, Plan Procurement Management, and Plan Stakeholder Management.

Without further ado, here are the six processes of the Planning Process Group that I am covering in this post.

Introducing the Plan Cost Management process - NEW IN PMBOK 5th EDITION

The Plan Cost Management process is a new process to the Planning Process Group and the Project Cost Management Knowledge Area. This process creates the cost management plan that is used to define, validate, and control project costs.

The Plan Cost Management process has four inputs:

  • the project management plan
  • the project charter
  • enterprise environmental factors (EEFs)
  • organizational process assets (OPAs)

This process has three tools/techniques: expert judgment, analytical techniques,  and meetings. The analytical techniques include payback period, return on investment, internal rate of return, discounted cash flow, and net present value.

This process produces one output: logically enough, it is the cost management plan. The cost management plan is an input to the Define Activities, Sequence Activities, Identify Risks, and Perform Quantitative Risk Analysis processes.

Changes to the Estimate Costs process

The Estimate Costs process now has seven inputs:

  • the cost management plan - new to the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • the human resource management plan – called the human resource plan in the PMBOK 4th Edition
  • the risk register
  • the scope baseline
  • the project schedule
  • enterprise environmental factors (EEFs)
  • organizational process assets (OPAs)

This process has one new technique: group decision-making techniques. This is actually a group of techniques that include brainstorming and Delphi or nominal group techniques.

The outputs of this process are also unchanged from the PMBOK 4th Edition, and include the activity cost estimates, basis of estimates, and project document updates.

One section of this process that has been expanded a bit is the reserve analysis section. This section now contains a more comprehensive explanation of reserves, including contingency reserves (known-unknowns) and management reserves (unknown-unknowns.)

Changes to the Determine Budget process

The Determine Budget process has three new inputs. The nine inputs to this process are:

  • the cost management plan (a new input, and an output of the Plan Cost Management process)
  • the scope baseline
  • the activity cost estimates
  • basis of estimates
  • the project schedule
  • resource calendars
  • the risk register (new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition)
  • agreements (new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition)
  • organizational process assets (OPAs)

The tools and techniques used by this process have not changed.

The outputs of this process have one very small change: the cost performance baseline output from the PMBOK 4th Edition was renamed the cost baseline in the PMBOK 5th Edition.

The Cost Baseline section of this process has been expanded quite a bit to include the contingency and management reserves. A new figure (Figure 7-8) named Project Budget Components was also added to show how the budget components make up the project budget.

Changes to the Plan Quality Management process (formerly the Plan Quality process)

For this process, there was a name change in the PMBOK 5th Edition: Plan Quality was changed to Plan Quality Management.

The Plan Quality Management has two new inputs. The six inputs to this process are:

  • the project management plan (new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition)
  • the stakeholder register
  • the risk register
  • the requirements documentation (new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition)
  • enterprise environmental factors (EEFs)
  • organizational process assets (OPAs)

There are two new tools used in this process. One new tool is meetings. The other new tool, called seven basic quality tools, actually contains (as its name implies) seven tools, one of which was previously listed in the PMBOK 4th Edition:

  • Cause-and-effect diagram
  • Flowcharts
  • Checksheets
  • Pareto diagrams
  • Histograms
  • Control charts – included in PMBOK 4th Edition
  • Scatter diagrams

The section on the seven basic quality tools includes an illustration (Figure 8-7) that gives examples of the seven tools.

There are no changes to the outputs from this process.

Changes to the Plan Human Resource Management process (formerly the Develop Human Resource Plan process)

For this process, there was a name change in the PMBOK 5th Edition: Develop Human Resource Plan was changed to Plan Human Resource Management.

The Plan Human Resource Management process has one new input. The four inputs to this process are:

  • the project management plan (new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition)
  • activity resource requirements
  • enterprise environmental factors (EEFs)
  • organizational process assets (OPAs)

The Plan Human Resource Management process has two tools/techniques: expert judgment and meetings.

While the output of this process is the same, its name has changed from human resource plan to human resource management plan.

Changes to the Plan Communications Management process (formerly the Plan Communications process)

For this process, there was a name change in the PMBOK 5th Edition: Plan Communications was changed to Plan Communications Management.

The Plan Communications Management process has one new input. The four inputs to this process are:

  • the project management plan (new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition)
  • activity resource requirements
  • enterprise environmental factors (EEFs)
  • organizational process assets (OPAs)

The Plan Communications Management process has one new tool/technique: meetings. However, two of the existing tools, communication technology and communication models, have undergone some fairly extensive edits/additions. So an experienced project manager may want to read this section just to get familiar with the new content and terminology. The complete list of tools for this process is:

  • communications requirements analysis
  • communication methods
  • communication technology
  • communication models
  • meetings (new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition)

The outputs of this process have not changed, and remain the communications management plan and project document updates.

That covers all the processes for this post. Watch for Part 4 of the Planning Process Group in the coming days.

Drop  me a line if you have any questions! I would love to hear from you….

-Robin

PMBOK 5th Edition: changes to the Planning Process Group (Part 2 of 4) 4/9

October 23, 2013 at 11:20 am | Posted in PMI, Study hints | Leave a comment
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It’s me again. For those of you just tuning in, I have already released three blog posts:

Because the Planning Process Group contains 24 processes, I will be breaking this overview into four posts to cover all of its processes in smaller, more easily digestible chunks.

Part 2 (this post) will cover the following processes:

  • Plan Schedule Management
  • Define Activities
  • Sequence Activities
  • Estimate Activity Resources
  • Estimate Activity Durations
  • Develop Schedule

The rest of the processes are broken down as follows:

  • Part 1 covered Develop Project Management Plan, Plan Scope Management, Collect Requirements, Define Scope, and Create WBS
  • Part 3 will cover Plan Cost Management, Estimate Costs, Determine Budget, Plan Quality Management, Plan Human Resource Management, and Plan Communications Management.
  • Part 4 will cover Plan Risk Management, Identify Risks, Perform Qualitative Risk Analysis, Perform Quantitative Risk Analysis, Plan Risk Responses, Plan Procurement Management, and Plan Stakeholder Management.

Without further ado, here are the six processes of the Planning Process Group that belong in the Project Time Management Knowledge Area. Let’s get to it!

Introducing the Plan Schedule Management process - NEW IN PMBOK 5th EDITION

The Plan Schedule Management process is a new process to the Planning Process Group and the Project Time Management Knowledge Area. This process creates the schedule management plan that is used to define, validate, and control project time.

The Plan Schedule Management process has four inputs:

  • the project management plan
  • the project charter
  • enterprise environmental factors (EEFs)
  • organizational process assets (OPAs)

This process has three tools/techniques: expert judgment, analytical techniques,  and meetings. The analytical techniques include rolling wave planning, leads and lags, alternatives analysis, and methods for reviewing schedule performance.

This process produces one output: the schedule management plan. The schedule management plan is an input to the Define Activities, Sequence Activities, Estimate Activity Resources, Estimate Activity Durations, Develop Schedule, Identify Risks, and Perform Quantitative Risk Analysis processes.

Changes to the Define Activities process

The Define Activities process now has four inputs:

  • the schedule management plan - new to the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • the scope baseline
  • enterprise environmental factors (EEFs)
  • organizational process assets (OPAs)

The tools and techniques used during this process have not changed and are as follows: decomposition, rolling wave planning, and expert judgement.

The outputs of this process are also unchanged from the PMBOK 4th Edition, and include the activity list, activity attributes, and milestone list. All of these outputs are inputs to the other Project Time Management processes in the Planning Process Group.

Changes to the Sequence Activities process

The Sequence Activities process has two new inputs. The seven inputs to this process are:

  • the schedule management plan (a new input, and an output of the Plan Schedule Management process)
  • the activity list
  • activity attributes
  • the milestone list
  • the project scope statement
  • enterprise environmental factors (EEFs) (new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition)
  • organizational process assets (OPAs)

The Sequence Activities process has two small changes to its tools/techniques: applying leads and lags has been renamed to leads and lags, and schedule network templates have been removed.

The outputs of this process have not changed.

I would like to highlight some great new information that is included in this section in the PMBOK 5th Edition. The Precedence Diagramming Method section (6.3.2.1) has been expanded to better explain the different relationships. Also, a new figure (Figure 6-9) has been added to demonstrate how the relationships are displayed in a diagram. In the Dependency Determination section (6.3.2.2), a new dependency type, internal dependencies, has been added. In the Leads and Lags section (6.3.2.3), a new figure (Figure 6-10) named Examples of Lead and Lag is given. Finally the Project Schedule Network Diagrams section (6.3.3.1) includes a new project schedule network diagram figure (Figure 6-11).

Changes to the Estimate Activity Resources process

The Estimate Activity Resources has three new inputs. That means the complete set of inputs to this process is:

  • the schedule management plan (a new input, and an output of the Plan Schedule Management process)
  • the activity list
  • activity attributes
  • resource calendars
  • risk register (new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition)
  • activity cost estimates (new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition)
  • enterprise environmental factors (EEFs)
  • organizational process assets (OPAs)

There are no changes to the tools/techniques used in this process or to the outputs from this process.

Changes to the Estimate Activity Durations process

The Estimate Activity Durations process has three new inputs. The ten inputs to this process are:

  • the schedule management plan (a new input, and an output of the Plan Schedule Management process)
  • the activity list
  • activity attributes
  • activity resource requirements
  • resource calendars
  • the project scope statement
  • risk register (new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition)
  • resource breakdown structure (new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition)
  • enterprise environmental factors (EEFs)
  • organizational process assets (OPAs)

The Estimate Activity Durations process has one new tool/technique: group decision-making techniques. This includes brainstorming and Delphi or nominal group technique. The complete list of tools/techniques for this process is:

  • expert judgment
  • analogous estimating
  • parametric estimating
  • three-point estimating
  • group decision-making techniques (new)
  • reserve analysis

The outputs of this process have not changed. The outputs are still activity duration estimates and project document updates.

Changes to the Develop Schedule process

The Develop Schedule process has four new inputs. The thirteen inputs to this process are:

  • the schedule management plan (a new input, and an output of the Plan Schedule Management process)
  • the activity list
  • activity attributes
  • project schedule network diagrams
  • activity resource requirements
  • resource calendars
  • activity duration estimates
  • the project scope statement
  • risk register (new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition)
  • project staff assignments (new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition)
  • resource breakdown structure (new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition)
  • enterprise environmental factors (EEFs)
  • organizational process assets (OPAs)

The Develop Schedule process has two new tools/techniques: resource optimization techniques (which includes the resource leveling technique from the PMBOK 4th Edition and resource smoothing, a new technique) and modeling techniques (which includes what-if schedule analysis technique from the PMBOK 4th Edition and simulation, a new technique). Also, the applying leads and lags technique has been renamed to leads and lags.

Two new outputs have been added to this process: project calendars and project management plan updates. The complete list of outputs is schedule baseline, project schedule, schedule data, project calendars, project management plan updates, and project document updates.

Again, the PMBOK 5th Edition has added some very useful information to this section. The description of the Critical Path Method (6.6.2.2) has been expanded to better explain the method, and a new figure (Figure 6-18) has been added to demonstrate the critical path method. All activity boxes in the diagram have been expanded to include the ES, EF, LS, LF, duration, and slack of the activity. If you are unfamiliar with this method, I would strongly suggest that you look over section 6.6.2.2 and seek out other learning tools to familiarize yourself with this technique. I can guarantee this will be on the live exam in some manner!

The Critical Chain Method section (6.6.2.3) has also been expanded and includes a new figure (Figure 6-19) that is useful. Resource leveling is also demonstrated in Figure 6-20, another new figure.

That covers all the processes for this post. Watch for Part 3 of the Planning Process Group in the coming days.

Drop  me a line if you have any questions! I would love to hear from you….

-Robin

PMBOK 5th Edition: changes to the Initiating Process Group 2/9

October 1, 2013 at 11:41 am | Posted in PMI, Study hints, Transcender news | Leave a comment
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If you read my previous post on the Knowledge Area and Process Group changes from PMBOK 4th Edition, you already know that PMI has made quite a few changes in the PMBOK 5th Edition. As promised in that earlier blog post, this is the first in a series to discuss the differences for each of the Process Groups and processes. In this post, I will cover the Initiating Process Group in full.

The Initiating Process Group is the first Process Group for projects, so it seemed like the logical place to start. This Process Group includes the Develop Project Charter and Identify Stakeholders processes.  There are just a few changes to these two processes.

Develop Project Charter process changes

The Develop Project Charter process still has five inputs. However, the contracts input in the PMBOK 4th Edition was changed to the agreements input in the PMBOK 5th Edition. This change more properly reflects the actual types of documents that can be included – such as contacts, memorandums of understanding (MOUs), service level agreements (SLAs), letters of agreement, letters of intent, verbal agreements, e-mail, or other written agreements.

The other four Develop Project Charter process inputs are the same: project statement of work, the business case, enterprise environmental factors, and organizational process assets.

One new technique has been added to the Develop Project Charter process: facilitation techniques. These techniques include, but are not limited to, brainstorming, problem solving, conflict resolution, and meeting management.

The project charter is still the output of the Develop Project Charter. However, the processes for which the project charter is an input have changed. The project charter is now considered an input to the Develop Project Management Plan, Plan Scope Management, Collect Requirements, Define Scope, Plan Schedule Management, Plan Cost Management, Plan Risk Management, and Identify Stakeholders processes. Last note on project charters, the PMBOK 5th Edition now requires that all project assumptions and constraints, the stakeholder list, and project high-level boundaries be documented in the project charter.

Identify Stakeholders Process changes

While the Identify Stakeholders process is still part of the Initiating Process Group, it has been moved to a new Knowledge Area: Project Stakeholder Management.

One new tool  has been added to the Identify Stakeholders process: meetings.  These meetings provide a means to develop an understanding of the project stakeholders and should document the roles, interests, knowledge, and position of each stakeholder.

There are no changes to the inputs for the Identity Stakeholders process. There is one change to the outputs: the stakeholder management strategy has been removed as an output of the Identify Stakeholders process, mainly because the stakeholder management plan is now created in the new Plan Stakeholder Management process. The stakeholder register is now the only output of the Identify Stakeholders process.

Additionally, the stakeholder register is now an input to the Collect Requirements, Plan Quality Management, Plan Communications Management, Plan Risk Management, Identify Risks, Plan Procurement Management, and Plan Stakeholder Management processes. The PMBOK 5th Edition has also added instructions regarding updating the stakeholder register on a regular basis as stakeholders change throughout the life of the project.

Summary

Because the Initiating Process Group is not very large, I come to the end of this post. My next post will cover the Planning Process Group. But with a total of 24 processes, I expect that I will need to divide the content into several posts. I expect for the Planning Process Group changes to encompass 3 to 4 posts, with the Executing, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing Process Groups coming after those.

Keep in mind that I am writing and revising content for our practice test as I am keeping y’all posted here on our blog. So feel free to ask any questions you may have. Who knows, some of your comments and questions might make it into our next product update! I’m glad that you took some time to peek into my world and hope you stick around for the next installment in this PMP series.

Until next time,

-Robin

PMBOK 5th Edition: Knowledge Area and Process Group changes 1/9

September 13, 2013 at 1:59 pm | Posted in PMI, Vendor news | Leave a comment
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In January of this year, the Project Management Institute (PMI) released the 5th Edition of the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK). While the book was released in January, the revised version of the Project Management Professional (PMP) exam was not released until July 31, 2013.  That means it’s now my favorite time of the year: time for Robin to develop a new Project Management Professional practice test for our customers! Each time I take on a PMP revision, I begin with a thorough analysis of the differences between the old and new PMBOK editions. As I review the two standards, I make notes of all the changes so that I can ensure that I am using the current terms, process names, Process Groups, and Knowledge Areas. Having just finished reviewing the new book, I thought this would be a great time to let all of our blog followers know about the Process Group and Knowledge Area changes.

Major and minor changes between PMBOK 4 and PMBOK 5

Many of you already know that I am a big fan of charts and tables. One of my favorite tables in the PMBOK is Table 3-1, which is included in both the 4th Edition and 5th Edition. This master table gives an overview of all Knowledge Areas, Process Groups, and processes so you can better understand their relationships. In reviewing the two versions of this Table, I discovered these key changes:

  1. A new Knowledge Area named Project Stakeholder Management has been added.
  2. Five new processes have been added.
  3. Eleven processes have had name changes.

Having isolated this information from Tables 3-1 (4th Edition and 5th Edition), I then listed all changes that I could find between the two editions, from name changes to additions and subtractions.

Process Groups

The Process Groups have not changed. They are still Initiating, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing.

Knowledge Areas

First, the newly added Project Stakeholder Management Knowledge Area contains four processes:

  • The Identify Stakeholder process has been moved from the Project Communications Management Knowledge Area, but remains in the Initiating Process Group.
  • The Plan Stakeholder Management process is a new process in the Planning Process Group.
  • The Manage Stakeholder Expectations process has been moved from the Project Communications Management Knowledge Area, but remains in the Executing Process Group. The process has been renamed the Manage Stakeholder Engagement process.
  • The Control Stakeholder Engagement process is a new process in the Monitoring and Controlling Process Group.

The Project Integration Management Knowledge Area has one change: The Direct and Manage Project Execution process has been renamed to Direct and Manage Project Work.

The Project Scope Management Knowledge Area has two changes:

  • A new process named Plan Scope Management has been added within the Planning Process Group.
  • The Verify Scope process has been renamed to Validate Scope.

The Project Time Management Knowledge Area has one change: The Plan Schedule Management process has been added  within the Planning Process Group.

The Project Cost Management Knowledge Area has one change: The Plan Cost Management process has been added within the Planning Process Group.

The Project Quality Management Knowledge Area has two changes:

  • The Plan Quality process has been renamed to Plan Quality Management.
  • The Perform Quality Control process has been renamed to Control Quality.

The Project Human Resource Management Knowledge Area has one change: The Develop Human Resource Plan process has been renamed the Plan Human Resource Management process.

The Project Communications Management Knowledge Area has five changes:

  • The Identify Stakeholders has been moved to the new Project Stakeholder Management Knowledge Area.
  • The Plan Communications process has been renamed to Plan Communications Management.
  • The Distribute Information process has been renamed Manage Communications, and has undergone some revisions.
  • The Manage Stakeholder Expectations process has been moved to the new Project Stakeholder Management Knowledge Area.
  • The Report Performance process has been renamed the Control Communications process and has undergone some revisions.

The Project Risk Management Knowledge Area has one change: The Monitor and Control Risks process has been renamed to Control Risks.

The Project Procurement Management Knowledge Area has two changes:

  • The Plan Procurements process has been renamed to Plan Procurement Management.
  • The Administer Procurements process has been renamed to Control Procurements.

Well, there you have it: All the changes to Process Groups and Knowledge Areas in PMBOK 5th Edition.  Also, keep in mind that I am communicating to you the official stance of PMI according to the PMBOK 5th Edition. Some folks will want to discuss the possibility that the Identify Stakeholders and Management Stakeholder Engagement processes that were moved are actually new processes. But they aren’t. If you read the content and compare it to the 4th Edition sections, you will see that much of the information is exactly the same. If you want to see a bit of the information I communicated above in a table format, please go to Heather Christian’s blog post at http://heatherchristian.wordpress.com/2013/01/14/knowledge-area-and-process-changes-in-the-pmbok-5th-edition/. Watch for my upcoming PMBOK series posts that will go into the nitty-gritty details about the Process Groups and the changes within the processes. The first post will be on the Initiating Process Group. Also, for those customers anxiously awaiting our PMP 5th Edition practice test, please know that we are working on the development and hope to have a new product released later this year. (And yes, we will release a new CAPM 5th Edition practice test as well!) Until next time -Robin

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