We want to know what YOU think about Transcender test prep products!

April 16, 2014 at 2:53 pm | Posted in Transcender news | Leave a comment
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To ensure better results and improve our product for you, we are doing a brief survey with IT professionals to get feedback on your IT certification test prep experience.

We WILL ask you:

  • Which certifications you plan to earn
  • How well our test prep products did (or didn’t!) work for you
  • Whether you want to tell us something that isn’t on the survey (hint: we’ll let you fill in the blank)

Start Survey Now

We will NOT ask you:

  • To choose your “spirit animal”
  • To cite your favorite shrubbery
  • To reveal personally identifiable information

Thanks for playing!

The Path to Project Management Mastery

March 21, 2014 at 10:02 am | Posted in Certification Paths, CompTIA, PMI | 2 Comments
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Project management is needed in almost all fields and includes both commercial and non-commercial projects. Many colleges and universities offer degrees in the field of project management. Search any job Web site, and you will find project management positions available with  many companies.

But what if you want to prove your proficiency in project management? There are many popular project management certifications that you can obtain. In this article, I want to discuss three of those certifications: CompTIA’s Project+, PMI’s Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM), and PMI’s Project Management Professional (PMP).

CompTIA’s Project+

Of the three certifications, CompTIA’s Project+ certification is probably the easiest to take. Like most CompTIA certifications, there are no prerequisites or qualifications to take this exam, although CompTIA does recommend one year of managing, directing, or participating in small- to medium-scale projects. The certification also does not require an application process. To take the exam, you simply register for the exam through Vue and pay the examination fee of $261 U.S.

The exam consists of 100 multiple-choice questions. You are given 90 minutes to complete the exam and need to obtain a score of 710 (on a scale of 100-900) to pass the exam.

Currently, this certification does NOT have an expiration date, meaning you will be Project+-certified for life.

PMI’s Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM)

To take the CAPM exam, you must first complete an online application. To qualify for the exam, you will need to have a high-school diploma (or equivalent) and 1,500 hours of professional experience on a project team OR 23 hours of formal project management education. Once the application is approved for completeness, you must then pay the exam fee of $225 (PMI members) or $300 (non-members).  (If your application is selected for audit, you have 90 days to submit the audit materials.) You have one year from the application approval date to take the exam.

The exam consists of 150 multiple-choice questions that focus on the material covered in the PMBOK 5th Edition. You are given 180 minutes to complete the exam. PMI does not publish the minimum score that you need to receive to obtain the certification, but you will receive a report when you complete the exam that lists your score and proficiency in the topic domains.

Currently, this certification expires five years from the date you originally passed the exam. You will need to re-take the exam to re-certify.

PMI’s Project Management Professional (PMP)

Like the CAPM exam, the PMP exam requires the completion of an online application. To qualify for the exam, you should have either of the following:

  • High-school diploma, associate’s degree, or equivalent
  • 5 years of professional project management experience
  • 35 hours of formal project management education

OR

  • Four-year degree or equivalent
  • 3 years of professional project management experience
  • 35 hours of formal project management education

Once the application is approved for completeness, you must then pay the exam fee of $405 (PMI members) or $555 (non-members) for the computer-based exam.  (If your application is selected for audit, you have 90 days to submit the audit materials.) You have one year from the application approval date to take the exam.

The exam consists of 200 multiple-choice, scenario-based questions based on the PMBOK 5th Edition. You are given 240 minutes to complete the exam. PMI does not publish the minimum score that you need to receive to obtain the certification, but you will receive a report when you complete the exam that lists your score and proficiency in the topic domains.

To maintain the certification, you must complete 60 professional development units (PDUs) within three years to renew the certification. If you do not obtain and report the PDUs, this certification expires three years from the date you originally passed the exam.

Certification Suggestions

If you are new to the project management field and only have a one or two years of experience, I suggest that you take the Project+ exam first. This exam will be a great start in your career path and will help you to gauge your knowledge of project management.

If you have several years experience in the project management field but do not have enough formal project management education to take the PMP exam, you should take the CAPM exam, which is also the next logical step after the Project+ exam.

As far as formal project management education goes, most college courses or training courses from a reputable training provider qualify. While PMI has a list of approved training providers for CEUs (the training credits required to maintain certification), the educational requirements for taking the certification exams are usually not as strict. However, you may need to provide a transcript or proof of completion. Find out the latest on education, certification requirements, and more on the PMI web site.

Once you have enough experience and formal education, take the PMP exam. This is one of the most highly respected certifications in the industry today.

While experienced project managers might choose to jump right in and take the PMP, newbies should probably start at the Project+ level.

If you are still undecided on whether project management certifications are the right way to go, consider this fact: According to salary.com, the median expected salary for a typical project manager in the United States is $107,056.

For most of us, that salary statistic may speak volumes and help to solidify our resolve to pursue the certifications.

Here’s hoping you achieve certification success in 2014!

-Robin

Death cometh for Windows XP?

March 21, 2014 at 7:58 am | Posted in Microsoft, Technical Tips, Vendor news | Leave a comment
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Microsoft has announced that as of April 8, 2014 there will no longer be any technical assistance for Windows XP. There will be no more automatic updates for Windows XP. You will be able to receive anti-malware signature updates if you have installed Microsoft Security Essentials for a limited time after 4/8/2014.  With no security patches to protect it, is this the death of Windows XP?

DeathComesForWindowsXP

I am not sure how to react to the death of Windows XP. Do I put on a coat and tie, invite some other XP users over, and say some nice words about the operating system? Do I sing “Dust in the Wind” like Will Ferrell did in  the movie “Old School”at the funeral for the beloved character “Blue”?

WillFarrelOldSchool

What I do know is that my Windows XP computer will not drop dead on 4/8/2014, but the risk of a Windows XP computer getting hacked increases significantly.

Who cares, you say? No one runs Windows XP anymore, you say? That is not quite true. As of December 2013, Windows XP computers represented  30%  market share according to netmarketshare.com.  According to the NCR corporation, 95% of the ATMs worldwide run Windows XP.  Not to mention the number of medical devices using Windows XP.  My coworker Ann snapped this photo during an unscheduled visit to the emergency room at a major metropolitan hospital on 3/14/14:

IMG_20140313_171543669_HDR

The end of support for Windows XP will require many companies to make decisions on the future of their products.  Product manufacturers will need to upgrade to stay ahead of any compliance issues caused by a lack of security updates.

Companies have been lukewarm to Windows 8, so I do not expect them to jump on the Windows 8 bandwagon. However, Windows 7 has been  up and running for several years and has a solid install base of about 47%, according to netmarketshare.com.  Granted, hardware will need to be upgraded or replaced to support the upgrade, but there are many other choices besides Windows 7.  Linux and Android have a chance to take advantage of this change.  Could the death of Windows XP mean Microsoft no longer dominates the operating system market?

In the past, companies continued to offer applications to customers who ran on outdated operating systems especially in the medical industry. I expect that companies will still support applications that run on Windows XP long after the end of the support date. People will still use old operating systems and drive old cars.  For example, I drive a car that is more than 41 years old, and I clock more than 8,500 miles a year on that car:

73VwSuperBeetle

My 1973 Volkswagon Beetle is not as safe as a car manufactured after 2010.  I drive it because it’s fun to drive, but I take precautions.  I will not drive the car for more than 100 miles at a time. I always make sure that I have an auto club subscription like AAA.  If you drive an old car, you know you’ll need to upgrade the brakes, upgrade the head lights, and upgrade the safety belts. I replaced the ignition in 2014. Similarly, if you decide to keep Windows XP on your home machine or have your company’s applications continue to run on Windows XP, you will need to keep a few things in mind:

  • Older Internet browsers are lightning rods for security hacks. Upgrade those browsers to the latest version that will run on Windows XP.
  • Keep up-to-date anti-virus and anti-malware software.  Microsoft will support anti-malware signatures for some time after the end of support date. Look for third-party companies that may continue to provide anti-virus and anti-malware support for Windows XP.
  • Scale back privileges on the computer.  Restrict administrator privileges anywhere possible to minimize risks.
  • Have a plan to move data to a new operating system.

Microsoft offers a free program to migrate your data from Windows XP to Windows 8.1 called LapLink. The program will transfer your data, but will NOT migrate your applications.  There are several third party applications that will transfer data and applications that you can purchase such as PCmover.

Although we do not like to think about it, death comes for us all.  Like my father, the insurance salesman, would say, “You always need to provide for the inevitability of death”.  If you have Windows XP, death is knocking on the door. Make sure that you insure yourself against the security risks of running Windows XP and have a plan for moving data to a new operating system.

HomerTheEndIsNear

Good Luck!

Ch-ch-ch-changes: Turn and face the change (to Windows Server 2012 R2 exams)

March 12, 2014 at 9:03 am | Posted in Microsoft, Study hints, Vendor news | 6 Comments
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The first song I ever heard by David Bowie was “Rebel, Rebel” and in the video, he had scarlet red hair, an eyepatch, and some stylin’ 70s pantaloons.  If you have followed the (not parallel, but similarly meteoric) careers of Windows Server and British rock star David Bowie, you will see one common thread. Can you guess what it is?

PhasesOfBowie

Mr. Bowie, like Windows Server, has gone through several significant changes of appearance since those early days. The first version of Window Server I ever used was Windows NT 3.1. Despite undergoing several version updates since then, some core functionalities have stayed the same.

WinServerVersions Now there is a new version on the market, Windows Server 2012 R2. Late last year Microsoft announced that they would modify the existing Window Server 2012 certification exams to cover  R2 (70-41070-411, and 70-412). The Windows Server 2012 R2 exam changes officially took effect in January 2014, although we saw staggered rollout in the field. So if you spent good money taking a Microsoft Official Curriculum (MOC) course on Server 2012, only to find yourself under pressure taking an exam that tested concepts from Server 2012 R2, you may be asking why Microsoft felt the need to update the exam content so soon. I have met several people at Microsoft. They are not mean people who pull the wings off of butterflies; they are actually really, really nice folk.  It’s simply that the exams needed to reflect the new features of Windows Server 2012 R2. David Bowie is not content to just live off his old tunes; he put out his 24th album in 2013.  In similar fashion, Microsoft is not content for certification candidates to know what might soon be a legacy operating systems. They want to ensure that candidates for their flagship MCSA and MCSE certifications are tested on the newest features deployed to the field.

Without further ado, here are the additions to the official exam objectives list for the  70-410, 70-411, and 70-412 exams. 70-410certChanges 70-411certChanges 70-412certChanges While you can purchase the latest album from David Bowie  and listen to it, you may not yet be able to find much training on the new R2 features.  The best way to prepare for this exam is to set up a couple of servers and work through each of the tasks listed in the exam objectives. You can get a free evaluation copy of Windows Server 2012 R2. There aren’t a lot of books on Windows Server 2012 R2 yet. I would use TechNet and other online resources to study the information on each sub-objective. I find that Microsoft generally pulls test questions from the examples in TechNet. I would ensure that I was 100% confident with each sub-objective listed on the prep guide before attempting the live exam. Reviewing information on a particular sub-objective will ensure that you will not see anything that you are not familiar with on the exam.

If you need extra hands-on experience but do not want to spend hours configuring a server, try using the FREE virtual labs at the following link: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/bb467605. These labs allow you to have 90 minutes of practice lab time on a Windows Server for FREE.

We will be cranking out the Windows  Server 2012 R2 updates for the 70-412 Transcender practice exam in the next few weeks. (Drop a comment here to be added to our notification list.) And you better believe I’ll be listening to a little David Bowie while we do it.

You can check out the already updated R2 Transcender practice tests here:

  • 70-410, Installing and Configuring R2
  • 70-411, Administering R2
Until next time,
George Monsalvatge

PMP: Another Perspective

February 20, 2014 at 11:58 am | Posted in PMI, Study hints | Leave a comment
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If you have been following Transcender’s blog for a while, you know that we write a lot of posts about the PMP certification. We’ve blogged about the PMBOK changes, the application process, and even our test-taking experience.  And, sometimes, we find other sources that we feel are worth sharing with our readers.

Heather Christian recently blogged about her exam experience. It wasn’t pretty. It wasn’t perfect. But it was a pass! And although she didn’t use our exam preparation product, we felt what she had to say about her overall experience was important information. So we decided to share the link to her blog with you, hoping that it might help you on your journey: http://heatherchristian.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/journey-to-pmp/.

Here’s a quick sample:

 I had been given the advice to read the last two sentences at the end of long questions and figure out what they are trying to ask before reading the whole thing. . . . I was only really caught out trying to over complicate a question once.  I quickly realized that calculating the paths given me in one of the network diagram questions was a fools errand that would take me 20 minutes.  A quick re-scan of the question revealed information that made the hairy seeming question very very simple.

Incidentally, if Heather’s blog inspires you, our PMP practice test has been updated to the PMBOK 5th Edition.

Happy testing!

-Robin

PMBOK 5th Edition: Changes to the Closing Process Group (9/9)

February 3, 2014 at 2:59 pm | Posted in Certification Paths, PMI | 3 Comments
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This is the ninth installment of my PMBOK 5th Edition overview. With this post, we bring to an end our review of the changes in the PMBOK 5th Edition.

The previous posts were:

The Closing Process Group has two processes:

  • Close Project or Phase
  • Close Procurements
Changes to the Close Project or Phase process

No changes were made to the inputs or outputs of the Close Project or Phase process.

Two tools/techniques were added to this process: analytical techniques (which includes regression analysis and trend analysis) and meetings.

Changes to the Close Procurements process

No changes were made to the inputs or outputs of the Close Procurements process.

One new tool was added to this process: procurement negotiations.

Wow, that was short and sweet – kinda makes the four posts on the Planning phase look incredibly large, huh?

We plan to do an article in the coming days that compares/contrasts the three main project management certifications for which we offer products: CompTIA’s Project+, PMI’s CAPM, and PMI’s PMP. We think many of you will find this article valuable.

Drop  me a line if you have any questions! I would love to hear from you….

-Robin

Join us: FREE CompTIA webinar starring Robin Abernathy

January 29, 2014 at 1:57 pm | Posted in CompTIA, Conferences, Performance-Based Testing, Transcender news | Leave a comment
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Our very own Robin Abernathy will be talking all about performance-based testing, CEUs, and security certifications on Thursday, January 30th at 4pm ET in a webinar hosted by CompTIA. This event is the first of what will be a Professional Development series of webinars hosted by CompTIA and starring some of our favorite industry experts.

Register here to join in the fun! Note that although the description says ‘For Academy Partners,’ this webinar is open to anyone who creates a login ID.

To see the lineup of upcoming events, or to meet some of these experts in person at the next CompTIA Academy Educator Conference this August in Phoenix, AZ, visit:  CompTIA Events

Stop by the Transcender booth at FETC 2014 for the Microsoft Surface giveaway!

January 21, 2014 at 1:52 pm | Posted in Conferences, Vendor news | Leave a comment

If you’re attending the Florida Educational Technology Conference (FETC) in sunny Orlando this year, be sure to stop by the Transcender booth (#1071) and sign up for your chance to win a Microsoft Surface tablet. It’s also a great time to chat with our Regional Sales Director about your IT education challenges and how we can help.

Our booth is conveniently located between Learning Lab #3 and Learning Lab #2, right next to the food court.

fetc booth

You can stay abreast of all conference updates by following @FETC on Twitter and hashtag #FETC.

fetc

PMBOK 5th Edition: Changes to the Monitoring and Controlling Process Group (8/9)

January 9, 2014 at 3:57 pm | Posted in Certification Paths, PMI | 2 Comments
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This is the eighth installment of my PMBOK 5th Edition overview. The previous posts in the series are:

The Monitoring and Controlling Process Group has a few changes, including one new process and four process name changes. This post will cover the following processes:

  • Monitor and Control Project Work
  • Perform Integrated Change Control
  • Validate Scope
  • Control Scope
  • Control Schedule
  • Control Costs
  • Control Quality
  • Control Communications
  • Control Risks
  • Control Procurements
  • Control Stakeholder Engagement

So now let’s get to the Monitoring and Controlling Process Group changes!

Changes to the Monitor and Control Project Work process

The Monitor and Control Project Work process has four new inputs. The inputs to this process are as follows:

  • project management plan
  • schedule forecasts – new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • cost forecasts – new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • validated changes – new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • work performance information – new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • enterprise environmental factors
  • organizational process assets

This process has three new tools and techniques: analytical techniques, project management information system, and meetings. The analytical techniques include regression analysis, grouping methods, causal analysis, root cause analysis, forecasting methods, failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), fault tree analysis (FTA), reserve analysis, trend analysis, earned value management, and variance analysis.

One new output has been added to this process: work performance reports.

Changes to the Perform Integrated Change Control process

The name of one of the inputs to the Perform Integrated Change Control process has been changed: work performance information is now referred to work performance reports to better reflect the state of the data when it is used by this process.

As I mentioned in the Executing Process Group Changes article, the terms work performance data, work performance information, and work performance reports have been better defined and separated in the PMBOK 5th Edition. Work performance data is raw data from the project. Work performance information is the work performance data combined with some technique or tool to produce usable conclusions or metrics. Work performance reports is the work performance information that is arranged into a project report (usually based on some reporting template).

One new tool was added to this process: change control tools. The name of one tool was changed: change control meetings is now referred to meetings.

Two new outputs have been added to this process: approved change requests and the change log. Change request status updates has been removed as an output of this process.

Changes to the Validate Scope process (formerly the Verify Scope process)

In the PMBOK 5th Edition, the Verify Scope process has been renamed to the Validate Scope process.  Somewhat confusingly, the input previously named the validated deliverables (of the Verify Scope process) has been renamed the verified deliverables input (of the Validate Scope process). Work performance data has been added to this process as an input.

One new technique has been added to this process: group decision-making techniques.

One new output was added to this process: work performance information.

Changes to the Control Scope process

The Control Scope process only has a couple of changes. The work performance information input has been changed to work performance data. The work performance measurements output has been changed to work performance information.

Changes to the Control Schedule process

The Control Schedule has two new inputs and one input name change. The inputs to this process are as follows:

  • project management plan
  • project schedule
  • work performance data – referred to as work performance information in the PMBOK 4th Edition.
  • project calendars – new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • schedule data – new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition
  • organizational process assets

This process has two new techniques. The full list of tools and techniques used by this process are as follows:

  • performance reviews – includes trend analysis, critical path method (CPM), critical chain method (CCM), and earned value management (EVM).
  • project management software
  • resource optimization techniques – new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition. The techniques listed include resource leveling and resource smoothing.
  • modeling technique – new to this process in the PMBOK 5th Edition.The techniques listed include what-if scenario analysis and simulation.
  • leads and lags – referred to as applying leads and lags in the PMBOK 4th Edition.
  • schedule compression
  • scheduling tool

One new output was added to this process: schedule forecasts. The work performance measurements output was changed to work performance information.

Changes to the Control Costs process

One input to the Control Costs process was changed: work performance information was changed to work performance data. Reserve analysis was added as a new tool/technique for this process. Finally, the name of two outputs was revised: work performance measurements was changed to work performance information, and budget forecasts was changed to cost forecasts.

Changes to the Control Quality process (formerly the Perform Quality Control process)

In the PMBOK 5th Edition, the Perform Quality Control process has been renamed to the Control Quality process.  The work performance measurements input was changed to work performance data. Project documents were added as an input to this process.

In the PMBOK 4th Edition, there were ten tools/techniques listed. In the PMBOK 5th Edition, seven of these tools were combined under the heading of seven basic quality tools, which includes cause-and-effect diagrams, flowcharts, check sheets, Pareto diagrams, histograms, control charts, and scatter diagrams. There are now four tools/techniques assigned to this process:

  • seven basic quality tools (cause-and-effect diagrams, flowcharts, check sheets, Pareto diagrams, histograms, control charts, and scatter diagrams)
  • statistical sampling
  • inspection
  • approved change requests review

For this process, there is one new output: work performance information. The validated deliverables outputs was changed to verified deliverables.

Changes to the Control Communications process (formerly the Report Performance process)

According to PMI, a name change occurred in the PMBOK 5th Edition for this process: Report Performance was changed to Control Communications. However, there were so many changes to this process that I feel we need to review this process in its entirety.

The Control Communications process has five inputs:

  • project management plan
  • project communications
  • issue log
  • work performance data
  • organizational process assets

The Control Communications process has three tools and techniques:

  • information management systems
  • expert judgment
  • meetings

The outputs of this process are as follows:

  • work performance information
  • change requests
  • project management plan updates
  • project document updates
  • organizational process assets updates
Changes to the Control Risks process (formerly the Monitor and Control Risks process)

In the PMBOK 5th Edition, the Monitor and Control Risks process has been renamed to the Control Risks process.  The work performance measurements input was changed to work performance data. The performance reports input was changed to work performance reports.

The status meetings tool is now referred to as simply meetings.

Work performance information was added as a new output of this process. Risk register updates has been removed as an output of this process.

Changes to the Control Procurements process (formerly the Administer Procurements process)

In the PMBOK 5th Edition, the Administer Procurements process has been renamed to the Control Procurements process.  The inputs to this process are as follows:

  • project management plan
  • procurement documents
  • agreements – referred to as contracts in the PMBOK 4th Edition
  • approved change requests
  • work performance reports – referred to as performance reports in the PMBOK 4th Edition
  • work performance data – referred to as work performance information in the PMBOK 4th Edition

There are no changes to the tools and techniques for this process.

The procurement documentation output was changed to project documents updates because the broad category better describes the possible documents that can be used. Work performance information was added as a  new output of this process.

Introducing the Control Stakeholder Engagement process - NEW IN PMBOK 5th EDITION

The Control Stakeholder Engagement process is a new process to the Monitoring and Controlling Process Group and the Project Stakeholder Management Knowledge Area. This process controls overall project stakeholder relationships and stakeholder engagement.

The Control Stakeholder Management process has four inputs:

  • the project management plan
  • issue log
  • work performance data
  • project documents

This process has three tools/techniques: expert judgment, information management systems,  and meetings.

This process has five outputs, as follows:

  • work performance information
  • change requests
  • project management plan updates
  • project document updates
  • organizational process assets updates

That covers all the processes in the Executing Process Group. Watch in the coming days for the posts covering the changes to the Closing Process Group.

Drop  me a line if you have any questions! I would love to hear from you….

-Robin

Select Microsoft virtualization, SQL Server 2008, Windows Server 2008, and Windows 7 exams to retire this month

January 6, 2014 at 10:09 am | Posted in Certification Paths, Microsoft, Transcender news, Vendor news | 5 Comments
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If you are working on any of the following certifications, then set your calendar reminders and schedule your exam dates, because several Microsoft exams are retiring January 31, 2014. While you may still be able to get a certification in that technology, such as the still-current MCSA in SQL Server 2008, you will not be able to earn older MCITP or MCTS credentials.

(Note that Microsoft has not entirely abandoned the one-test MCTS certification track. We’ll cover the non-expiring MCITP and MCTS tracks in an upcoming post.)

The following certification tracks are either expiring completely, or are losing one of their required tests to expiration:

  • MCITP: Database Administrator 2008
  • MCITP: Database Developer 2008
  • MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
  • MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7
  • MCITP: Enterprise Administrator on Windows Server 2008
  • MCITP: Virtualization Administrator on Windows Server 2008 R2
  • MCTS: Windows Server 2008 R2, Server Virtualization
  • MCTS: Windows Server 2008 R2, Desktop Virtualization
  • MCTS: Windows 7 and Microsoft Office 2010, Deployment
  • MCTS: Windows Server 2008 Active Directory, Configuration
  • MCTS: Windows Server 2008 Network Infrastructure, Configuration
  • MCTS: Windows Server 2008 Applications Infrastructure, Configuration

The retiring exams include:

  • 70-450: PRO: Microsoft SQL Server 2008, Designing, Optimizing, and Maintaining a Database Administrative Solution
  • 70-451: PRO: Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Designing and Optimizing Database Solutions
  • 70-643: TS: Windows Server 2008 Applications Infrastructure, Configuring
  • 70-647: PRO: Windows Server 2008, Enterprise Administrator
  • 70-649: Upgrading your MCSE on Windows Server 2003 to Windows Server 2008, Technology Specialist
  • 70-659: TS: Windows Server 2008 R2, Server Virtualization
  • 70-669: TS: Windows Server 2008 R2, Desktop Virtualization
  • 70-681: TS: Windows 7 and Office 2010, Deploying
  • 70-682: PRO: Upgrading to Windows 7 MCITP Enterprise Desktop Support Technician
  • 70-693: PRO: Windows Server 2008 R2, Virtualization Administrator

For a complete list of retiring certifications, see this page: http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en-us/mcts-certification.aspx.

For a complete list of retiring exams, see this page: http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en-us/retired-certification-exams.aspx.

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